British Commandos Learn Marine Corps Tactics

British Commandos Learn Marine Corps Tactics

Marines with Battery B, 1st Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, and British commandos with 148 Battery, Royal Artillery, fire high explosive rounds down range during exercise Burmese Chase aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 23, 2014. Exercise Burmese Chase is an annual joint-service training exercise held by the Marines of 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company to improve relationships with the British Forces. Photo by LCpl Joshua Murray.

CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. (July 24, 2014) - British commandos with 148 Battery, Royal Artillery conducted Exercise Burmese Chase alongside of Marines from 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 2014.

Exercise Burmese Chase is an annual joint, international exercise hosted by the Marines of 1st ANGLICO that familiarizes the Marines and commandos with the tactics both parties use during operations in combat environments.

Maj Kieran Phillips, the commanding officer of 148 Battery, Royal artillery, said understanding how American and British forces work together is important for success in future combat operations.

"Chances are, in the next fight U.S. Marines and British forces will be working together," said Phillips. "So this exercise really puts us at an advantage because it allows our British forces to integrate with the Marines, learn some of their tactics and establish solid relationships."

While aboard Camp Pendleton, the British commandos conducted static-line jumps from MV-22 Ospreys, traded close quarter combat tactics with the Marines and experienced how Marines call for supporting fire on the battlefield.

LtCol Brian Russell, the commanding officer of 1st ANGLICO, said effective communication between allied forces is an essential part of working as a team.

"I know you hear it all the time but communication really is key," said Russell. "If our British allies need to call in artillery strikes or rain down some air superiority, they have to be able to communicate the coordinates for it."

Burmese Chase also allows British commandos and U.S. Marines to form bonds and relationships with each other prior to working together in theaters of operation.

"One of the most important aspects of this training aside from the tactical side is coming together with our largest ally," said Phillips. "A lot of the commandos and Marines from ANGLICO will be working together in the future, and it's great that they will have prior experiences working with each other."

Gunner Christopher Spakman, a commando with 148 Battery, said his unit is looking forward to training with the Marines of 1st ANGLICO in the near future.

"This exercise has really been a great opportunity for us to experience a lot of cool training and make new friends," said Spakman. "We all really enjoyed being out here with the Marines, and I'll be looking forward to coming out and training with [them] again."

The next training exercise combining the U.S. Marines and the British commandos is scheduled to take place this fall in Scotland.

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