Company H Recruits test their mental, physical strength

Company H Recruits test their mental, physical strength
Company H Recruits test their mental, physical strength

A recruit of Company H, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, carries a fellow recruit using the fireman's carry technique aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Dec. 20. The fireman's carry was just one exercise of many that recruits were required to do in their Combat Fitness Test. Photo by Cpl Matheus J. Hernandez.

Recruits of Company H, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, sprint around the depot's track during the movement to contact portion of the Combat Fitness Test Dec. 20. Movement to contact is a timed 880-yard run in boots and utility trousers. Photo by Cpl Matheus J. Hernandez.

MCRD SAN DIEGO (January 2, 2012) – Recruits of Company H, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, tested their strength and endurance in their final Combat Fitness Test (CFT) aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego December 20.

In the fleet, the CFT is an annual requirement all Marines must complete in order to show their combat-readiness. As it is commonly known, every Marine is a basic rifleman and all Marines must be ready to fight at all times. For recruits striving to earn the title, they must complete and pass the CFT in order to move forward with training.

Recruits of Co. H completed the CFT twice before and have been training for the final CFT for the past several weeks throughout Recruit Training.

"Our Drill Instructors prepared us well enough for the CFT," said Recruit Korey R. Newman, Platoon 2171, Co. H, 2nd RTBn. "It's by far one of the toughest things I've had to do, but it's definitely good training."

The CFT has three events, which include movement-to-contact, ammunition-can lift and maneuver-under-fire.

Movement-to-contact is an 880-yard run in boots and utility trousers. The second portion of the test involves raising a 30-pound ammunition can, fully extending the arms upward for two minutes, earning points for the number of lifts done in the given time.

The last part of the test consists of a 25-yard crawl, hauling a simulated casualty using two different carries over 75 yards through cones, a sprint while carrying two 30-pound ammunition cans over 75 yards through the same cones, throwing a dummy hand grenade into a marked circle 22.5 yards away, 3 pushups and a sprint with the ammo cans to the finish line.

"I'd say the most challenging portion of the CFT would have to be the maneuver under fire," said Newman, an Indianapolis native. "It's the last thing you do and by time you get to it you're just completely burnt out."

Drill Instructors used a set of specific exercises to train their recruits for the CFT. Some of the exercises included lunges, squats and push-ups to better cover the more dynamic and anaerobic training event.

The exercises proved to be useful for recruits once they finished their test, according to Recruit Jonathan Paul Griffiths, Plt. 2170, Co. H, 2nd RTBn.

"Our platoon has done (well) so far," said Griffiths, a Coldwater, Mich., native. "A lot of the recruits have improved significantly and I think it's because we have all pushed each other. You can see just how far we've come—from first phase to third phase. There's an amazing difference in (our performance)."

Recruits of Co. H completed their final CFT and overall improved their combat readiness. Having done so, this will allow recruits to be better prepared, should they earn the title "Marine."

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