Tactical combat casualty care course helps Marines in 2nd Recon

Tactical combat casualty care course helps Marines in 2nd Recon

Petty Officer 2nd Class Greg Norman, a special amphibious reconnaissance corpsman with 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, explains how a casualty collection point is coordinated with patients during a tactical combat casualty care course aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 8, 2015. More than 50 Marines with 2nd Recon participated in the course, which included classroom instruction, practical application, testing, and a final event where the Marines used the skills and knowledge to complete a final evaluation. Marine Corps photo by Cpl Alexander Mitchell.

CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. (August 3, 2015) - More than 40 Marines with 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, took a tactical combat casualty care course with the special amphibious reconnaissance corpsmen in the unit to obtain a better understanding of life-saving skills.

The course went from Aug. 3-12, 2015, with a real-world scenario event to complete the course, as well as evaluating and testing the Marines' knowledge and skills they learned throughout the course. Marines are expected to quickly assess injuries and perform emergency life-saving techniques during combat situations once completion.

"This course not only teaches Marines vital skills for combat or life-saving situations," said Petty Officer 2nd Class Greg Norman, a special amphibious reconnaissance corpsman with the battalion, "it also helps the leaders retain information and help instill the intelligence to the junior Marines."

TCCC is a strenuous course which revolves around casualty care during high-speed combat. Instructors teach classroom instruction, practical application, testing and a final event where the Marines must use all the skills and knowledge to complete a final evaluation. 

"We have gone over many types of medical skills including the three phases of care, 9-line casualty evacuation plan and lots of information of signs and stages of injuries," said LCpl Kai Tabuchi, a radio operator with the unit. "This helps us get a foundation of knowledge we can build on and be able to properly use the skills we learned when we need to."

The course involved casualty care but is geared more towards combat scenarios.

"The course has a higher level of importance for those forward deployed," Norman said. "Being in an unknown area and asked to do something you do not usually do can be physically and mentally tough, but this course will strengthen Marines so they may use the skills we teach them."

During the course, Marines had to retain much information and skills tied into it, but Norman finds teaching the course to Marines to be satisfying.

"I enjoy teaching the class," Norman said. "By teaching information you already know helps you become more knowledgeable, and in the future, I can better myself and get knowledge across to others easily. Plus, this course can help a Marine save another life one day."

The Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System (DVIDS) is provided as a public service operated by Third Army/U.S. Army Central (ARCENT) on behalf of the Department of the Army in support of all branches of the U.S. military (Navy, Air Force, Marines) and its Coalition partners serving in the U.S. Forces Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility.