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purpose

From ship to shore to objective, no equipment better defines the distinction and purpose of Marine Corps expeditionary capabilities than the AAV-7 Amphibious Assault Vehicle. Designed to assault any shoreline from the well decks of Navy assault ships, AAVs are highly mobile, tracked armored amphibious vehicles that transport Marines and cargo to and through hostile territory.

 

features

  • Typically, the first vehicles to land during beach raids and assaults
  • All-welded aluminum hull protects crew from small arms fire
  • Eight smoke grenade launchers
  • Turret armed with .50 cal machinegun and 40mm grenade launcher
  • Can be outfitted with Mine Clearance Line Charges
  • Operates at speeds of 45mph on land; 8-10 knots in water
  • Can carry 21 combat-loaded Marines and 3 crewmembers
  • Can transport 10,000 pounds of cargo
  • Can fire on land and water
  • Enough fuel to drive 300 miles inland

roles

Just a few of the enlisted AAV roles include:

  • AAV Repairer/Technician
  • AAV Crewman
  • Diesel Mechanic
  • Engineer Equipment Mechanic

View a list of roles in the Marine Corps.

 

Video

AAV7A1 Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAV)

Designed to assault any shoreline from the well decks of Navy assault ships, AAVs are highly mobile tracked and armored amphibious vehicles that transport Marines and cargo to and through hostile territory.