Physical Fitness

Marines must be physically fit throughout their time in service in order to win our nation’s battles.

Physical Fitness Test (PFT)

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The PFT is a standard test that measures the battle-readiness of each Marine once a year, with a focus on stamina and physical conditioning. The test consists of a three-mile run, pull-ups or pushups, and crunches. Marines are assessed on a points system across these three categories and must receive a high enough score to pass.

1. Pull-ups

Pull-ups and pushups are essential to building the upper body strength necessary to win battles. All Marines have the option to perform either exercise test, but the max score of 100 can only be attained by those who select pull-ups. Marines can only receive a max of 70 points if they choose to perform pushups. This distinction is due to the fact that pull-ups require Marines to lift their entire body weight, while pushups only require Marines to lift approximately 70 percent of their weight.

2. Crunches

Marines are tasked with doing as many modified crunches as they can in two minutes. A modified crunch is defined as placing your arms across your chest, and feet flat on the deck with knees bent. Without breaking contact between your arms and torso, lift your upper body until elbows touch knees. The movement is complete when your shoulders return to the deck.

3. Timed Run

Male recruits and Marines must complete the three-mile run in 28 minutes or less. Female recruits and Marines must complete the three-mile run in 31 minutes or less.

The PFT is a standard test that measures the battle-readiness of each Marine once a year, with a focus on stamina and physical conditioning. The test consists of a three-mile run, pull-ups or pushups, and crunches. Marines are assessed on a points system across these three categories and must receive a high enough score to pass.

1. Pull-ups

Pull-ups and pushups are essential to building the upper body strength necessary to win battles. All Marines have the option to perform either exercise test, but the max score of 100 can only be attained by those who select pull-ups. Marines can only receive a max of 70 points if they choose to perform pushups. This distinction is due to the fact that pull-ups require Marines to lift their entire body weight, while pushups only require Marines to lift approximately 70 percent of their weight.

2. Crunches

Marines are tasked with doing as many modified crunches as they can in two minutes. A modified crunch is defined as placing your arms across your chest, and feet flat on the deck with knees bent. Without breaking contact between your arms and torso, lift your upper body until elbows touch knees. The movement is complete when your shoulders return to the deck.

3. Timed Run

Male recruits and Marines must complete the three-mile run in 28 minutes or less. Female recruits and Marines must complete the three-mile run in 31 minutes or less.

Combat Fitness Test (CFT)

The CFT assesses a Marine’s functional fitness as it relates to the demands of fighting and winning battles. Males and females perform the same exercises, but are scored differently, on the same 300-point scale. There are three exercises that must be completed to the standards of the Marine Corps to pass the CFT: Movement to Contact, Ammunition Lift and Maneuver Under Fire.

1. Movement to Contact

A timed, 880-yard sprint tests each Marine’s endurance, mimicking the stresses of running under pressure in battle.

2. Ammunition Lift

Marines must lift a 30-pound ammunition can overhead until elbows lock out. The goal is to lift the can as many times as possible in a set amount of time.

3. Maneuver Under Fire

Marines must complete a 300-yard course that combines a variety of battle-related challenges including crawls, ammunition resupply, grenade throwing, agility running, and the dragging and carrying of another Marine.

The CFT assesses a Marine’s functional fitness as it relates to the demands of fighting and winning battles. Males and females perform the same exercises, but are scored differently, on the same 300-point scale. There are three exercises that must be completed to the standards of the Marine Corps to pass the CFT: Movement to Contact, Ammunition Lift and Maneuver Under Fire.

1. Movement to Contact

A timed, 880-yard sprint tests each Marine’s endurance, mimicking the stresses of running under pressure in battle.

2. Ammunition Lift

Marines must lift a 30-pound ammunition can overhead until elbows lock out. The goal is to lift the can as many times as possible in a set amount of time.

3. Maneuver Under Fire

Marines must complete a 300-yard course that combines a variety of battle-related challenges including crawls, ammunition resupply, grenade throwing, agility running, and the dragging and carrying of another Marine.