Frequently Asked Questions for Parents

Parents often have many questions when their child has shown an interest in becoming a Marine, or is preparing to leave for recruit training. Below are some of the most common questions parents have.

What happens if my recruit gets injured or can’t continue training?

FAQ Answer

In the event of an emergency, training delay, company transfer, or separation, the recruit will be permitted to call one person to notify them of the situation, its cause, and what happens next.

If the recruit cannot remember the phone number or is unable to reach someone, the recruit’s recruiter will be contacted. If the recruit is unable to make the phone call for any reason, depot personnel will call someone designated by the recruit.

How long is training?

FAQ Answer

Approximately 13 weeks. Receiving is the first week and actual training takes place for 12 weeks after that.

What happens during a hurricane evacuation or other natural disaster?

FAQ Answer

If recruits have to leave, they’ll be moved to another Marine Corps base to continue training until it’s safe to return. Recruits will be unable to call their next-of-kin during an evacuation due to the large number of recruits undergoing training.

Recruits will be kept informed about possible actions leading up to a natural disaster. Rely on letters from your recruit for information or monitor official resources such as the MCRD website.

What is a typical day of training like?

FAQ Answer

After getting ready for the day, recruits will eat breakfast before attending training or classes. They’ll break for lunch and then continue the scheduled training until dinner time. Recruits may also spend part of the day discussing core values and receiving coaching about future training from their drill instructors. The remainder of the evening is spent preparing for the day, cleaning the squad bay, and enjoying one hour of free time before lights out and 8 hours of sleep.

What does my recruit do during training?

FAQ Answer

Recruits are transformed into the world’s most elite fighting force through 13 weeks of rigorous training. Recruits will acquire the knowledge, discipline, teamwork, and fitness level required of a Marine through physical training, classroom instruction, and developing combat skills.

What happens during Receiving week?

FAQ Answer

Receiving week is 3–5 days processing to prepare recruits for their first day of actual training. They complete paperwork, receive haircuts, are issued uniforms and gear, undergo medical evaluations, and take the Initial Strength Test to ensure they are prepared for training. At the end of the week, they meet the team of drill instructors who will be responsible for them during training.

What is the Crucible?

FAQ Answer

The Crucible is the final 54-hour training exercise that tests the recruits on the knowledge, skills, and values taught throughout training. Those who complete the final challenge are awarded their Eagle, Globe, and Anchor, symbolizing their transformation from recruits to Marines.

Who do I contact if I have questions about training?

FAQ Answer

The best person to contact is your recruit’s recruiter.

When will I hear from my recruit?

FAQ Answer

Recruits are required to make one phone call the night they arrive to inform their next-of-kin or recruiter they’ve made it to training safely. After the initial phone call, all correspondence is made through letters and postcards.

Recruits will send their first letter home seven to nine days after they arrive. The letter will include their mailing address with company and platoon information.

When will I see my recruit again?

FAQ Answer

You can see your recruit during liberty on Family Day, the day before Graduation.

Can I visit my recruit?

FAQ Answer

You may not visit your recruit until Family Day, the day before Graduation.

Who do I contact if I have questions about getting in touch with my recruit?

FAQ Answer

The best person to contact is your recruit’s recruiter.

How do I send my recruit mail?

FAQ Answer

Recruits will send their first letter home seven to nine days after they arrive. The letter will include their mailing address with company and platoon information.

Can recruits make phone calls, send email, or use the internet?

FAQ Answer

Recruits are required to make one phone call the night they arrive to inform their next of kin or recruiter they’ve made it to training safely. After the initial phone call, all correspondence is made through letters and postcards.

New Marines can make personal calls and use the internet during on-base liberty on the Sunday after the Crucible, the following Saturday and Sunday, and the Thursday immediately before graduation.

How does my Marine get home?

FAQ Answer

Marines can drive, fly, or take a bus with their families. If you plan on taking a bus or flight home and will not be purchasing tickets for your Marine, provide them with your travel itinerary as soon as possible so SATO Travel can try to match his or her travel plans with yours.

How does my Marine get to the SOI?

FAQ Answer

Marines will receive a set of orders when they leave training telling them exactly when, where, and how to get to their next duty station. All recruits are required to book commercial travel from their leave location to Camp Lejeune.

What happens after Graduation?

FAQ Answer

Marines receive one day of travel and ten days of leave after Graduation before attending the School of Infantry (SOI). Marines participating in the Recruiter Assistance program will receive up to thirty days of leave before attending the SOI.

Those with an Infantry Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) are trained at Infantry Training Battalion (ITB) over the course of 52 days, and those with a non-Infantry MOS are trained at Marine Combat Training Battalion (MCT) over the course of 29 days.

Upon completion of SOI, non-Infantry MOS Marines attend their MOS school, which varies in length, graduation requirements, and locations. All Marines are then assigned to a unit with a Permanent Duty Station (PDS).

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FAQs

One doesn't consider an endeavor of this magnitude without having questions. Here are some of the most common.

 
 

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