Uniforms, Ranks
& Symbols

Every stitch of a Marine uniform represents the ethos and spirit of the Corps.

Legendary Uniforms

SHARE

Whether it's the cammies worn during training and combat or the famed dress blues for which Marines are known, our uniforms have a purpose and meaning sewn into them. Both uniforms are a reminder of who we defend as well as pay homage to those Marines who fought before them.

  • Next
    Prev

    Eagle, Globe and Anchor

    There is no better symbol for the purpose we serve than the emblem every Marine earns: the Eagle, Globe and Anchor. The eagle represents the proud nation we defend. It stands at the ready with our coastlines in sight and the entire world within reach of its outstretched wings. The globe represents our worldwide presence. The anchor points both to the Marine Corps' naval heritage and its ability to access any coastline in the world. Together, the eagle, globe and anchor symbolize our commitment to defend our nation—in the air, on land and at sea.

    Eagle, Globe and Anchor

    There is no better symbol for the purpose we serve than the emblem every Marine earns: the Eagle, Globe and Anchor. The eagle represents the proud nation we defend. It stands at the ready with our coastlines in sight and the entire world within reach of its outstretched wings. The globe represents our worldwide presence. The anchor points both to the Marine Corps' naval heritage and its ability to access any coastline in the world. Together, the eagle, globe and anchor symbolize our commitment to defend our nation—in the air, on land and at sea.

    Next
    Prev
  • Next
    Prev

    Dress Blues

    Marines are known for our distinctive dress blue uniform, which has origins dating back to the American Revolution. Dress blues are worn for many events, including ceremonies with foreign officials, visits with U.S. civil officials and formal social functions attended in an official capacity.

    Dress Blues

    Marines are known for our distinctive dress blue uniform, which has origins dating back to the American Revolution. Dress blues are worn for many events, including ceremonies with foreign officials, visits with U.S. civil officials and formal social functions attended in an official capacity.

    Next
    Prev
  • Next
    Prev

    Blood Stripe

    Traditionally, Officers, Staff Noncommissioned Officers and Noncommissioned Officers of the Marine Corps have worn a scarlet red stripe on their dress blue trousers to commemorate the courage and tenacious fighting of the men who fought in the battle of Chapultepec in the Mexican War in September of 1847. Today, the blood stripe symbolizes honor for all fallen Marines.

    Blood Stripe

    Traditionally, Officers, Staff Noncommissioned Officers and Noncommissioned Officers of the Marine Corps have worn a scarlet red stripe on their dress blue trousers to commemorate the courage and tenacious fighting of the men who fought in the battle of Chapultepec in the Mexican War in September of 1847. Today, the blood stripe symbolizes honor for all fallen Marines.

    Next
    Prev
  • Next
    Prev

    Officer's Mameluke Sword

    Marines’ swords are the oldest United States Armed Forces weapons still in service and represent the Marine Corps' rich heritage. Officers carry the Mameluke Sword, which was originally given to Lieutenant Presley O'Bannon in 1805 by a Mameluke chieftain in North Africa. Lt O'Bannon and his Marines marched across 600 miles of North African desert to rid the "shores of Tripoli" of pirates and rescue the kidnapped crew of the USS Philadelphia. By 1825, all Marine Officers carried the Mameluke sword in recognition of this historic battle—the Marine Corps' first on foreign soil.

    Officer's Mameluke Sword

    Marines’ swords are the oldest United States Armed Forces weapons still in service and represent the Marine Corps' rich heritage. Officers carry the Mameluke Sword, which was originally given to Lieutenant Presley O'Bannon in 1805 by a Mameluke chieftain in North Africa. Lt O'Bannon and his Marines marched across 600 miles of North African desert to rid the "shores of Tripoli" of pirates and rescue the kidnapped crew of the USS Philadelphia. By 1825, all Marine Officers carried the Mameluke sword in recognition of this historic battle—the Marine Corps' first on foreign soil.

    Next
    Prev
  • Next
    Prev

    Marine NCO Sword

    Adopted in 1859, the NCO Sword is carried by Marine Noncommissioned Officers (NCOs) and Staff Noncommissioned Officers (SNCOs). Used for ceremonial purposes, the M1859 NCO Sword was bestowed to NCOs and SNCOs by the 6th Commandant, Colonel John Harris, in recognition of their leadership in combat.

    Marine NCO Sword

    Adopted in 1859, the NCO Sword is carried by Marine Noncommissioned Officers (NCOs) and Staff Noncommissioned Officers (SNCOs). Used for ceremonial purposes, the M1859 NCO Sword was bestowed to NCOs and SNCOs by the 6th Commandant, Colonel John Harris, in recognition of their leadership in combat.

    Next
    Prev